Students pursuing the Global Health Law & International Institutions LL.M. degree must complete the general degree requirements that apply to all LL.M. students, whether U.S.-trained or foreign-trained. 

In addition to these general requirements, the following specific requirements apply:

At Georgetown Law

Students must complete a total of 12 credits at Georgetown Law, of which 10 credits must be Global Health Law "specialization credits". 

As part of their required Global Health Law specialization credits, students must take the 4-credit course Global Health Law.

The remaining credits must be completed from an array of other health-related courses found in the Curriculum Guide.

Students must earn a minimum grade point average of "B-" (2.67/4.00) in the courses that are counted toward the LL.M. in Global Health Law and International Institutions specialization requirements.

Foreign-trained students (with their first degree in law from outside the United States):While not required, students are strongly recommended to enroll in U.S. Legal Research, Analysis and Writing. This course counts toward the 12 credit degree requirement but not the 10 specialization credits.

At the Graduate Institute (Geneva)

Students must complete a total of 39 credits at the Graduate Institute (one Georgetown Law credit is approximately equal to three Graduate Institute credits), of which 24 credits must be from courses in international law, humanitarian law, international trade law, international environmental law, refugee law and policy, international affairs, and international development studies, including:

  • Global Health Diplomacy
  • Human Rights Through the Concepts
  • Treatymaking in Contemporary International Society
  • Judicial Interpretation of Human Rights
  • Terrorism and International Law
  • Advanced Seminar on WTO Jurisprudence
  • The Security Council and Issues of Responsibility
  • The Fight Against Torture, Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment or Punishment
  • International Criminal Courts and Tribunals (Academy)
  • The UN and the Emerging Culture of Impunity (Academy)
  • Multilateral Governance and International Organizations
  • Global Environmental Governance
  • Environment, Population and Development
  • Managing the Global Commons
  • International Migration
  • Water Conflicts, Security and Cooperation

As part of their required 24 credits, students must take the two compulsory courses: International Health Law and Global Public Health: Current and Emerging Issues.

Students must complete either an approved internship or dissertation worth 15 credits.

  • The full-time internship must last for a minimum of 4 weeks, must have a dimension linked to global health legal and/or policy questions, and must be authorized in advance by the Joint LL.M. Committee. Students pursuing an internship must submit an application to the to the Global Health Law Program Director at Georgetown Law and LL.M. Programme Manager at the Graduate Institute at least one month prior to the beginning of the internship.

    It is expected that most students will complete this requirement at an international institution in Geneva (such as the World Health Organization, UNAIDS, or the World Trade Organization) either during the 6-week period between the end of the Fall semester at Georgetown Law and the beginning of the Spring semester at the Graduate Institute, or during the summer upon completing the Spring semester at the Graduate Institute.

    At the completion of the internship, students must submit a written report to the Global Health Law Program Director at Georgetown Law of no more than 5,000 words developing some of the themes and questions addressed during the internship. The report is graded and, in conjunction with completion of the internship, counts for 15 credits.

  • Students may undertake a dissertation instead of the required internship with the prior approval of both the Director of the Joint LL.M. at the Graduate Institute and the Director of the Global Health Law Program at Georgetown Law. A dissertation entitles the student to 15 credits.