Key Dates

Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 3 & 4 Info Sessions (10/3 @ 3:30 pm in Hart; 10/4 @ 8:00 pm in McD 200).  Powerpoint available here; recording available here.
Thursday, Sept. 29 Lottery forms available by 3:00 pm
Thursday, Oct. 6  Lottery forms due by 3:00 pm
Thursday, Oct. 13 Lottery results posted by 3:00 pm
Monday, Oct. 17 Deadline to claim seats by 3:00 pm; online waitlist form available
Jan. 9-12, 2017 Week One courses take place

 

Overview

Georgetown Law offers its first-year students the opportunity to take elective simulation courses during the week between their regular fall and spring semesters (“Week One”), on a seat available basis.  In these Week One courses, students engage in scenarios that have been developed by Georgetown Law faculty to mirror situations that lawyers face in the real world, allowing students to practice critical legal skills such as conflict resolution, trial skills, interviewing, client counseling, legal document drafting, strategic planning, problem solving, teambuilding, stress management, presentation skills, professionalism, and emotional intelligence.  Simulation courses are structured to permit for mistakes and provide opportunities for immediate feedback and reflection, giving students the supportive space to hone these legal skills before they need to rely on them in practice. For first-year students, the Week One courses are not only an introduction to experiential learning and the Law Center’s experiential education programming (http://www.law.georgetown.edu/go/lawexp), but a first-hand view into lawyering competencies and law in practice.  

Week One 2017 will take place from Monday, January 9 through Thursday, January 12, 2017.  Week One courses are optional, 1-credit courses, are graded pass/fail, and count toward the 6 credits of experiential coursework required of students matriculating as first-year students in Fall 2016 or later.  Attendance at all class sessions is mandatory.  A description of our first-year Week One offerings are provided below and in the online Curriculum Guide.  A lottery will be conducted in the Fall semester for interested students.  More information will be posted on this site and emailed to students closer to the time of the lottery.

Are you an upperclass student and interested in serving as a teaching fellow for a first-year Week One simulations course? Check out our Week One Teaching Fellows course description for more information. Teaching fellows earn 1 credit, pass/fail toward the spring semester. There will be an informal information session on Friday September 2, 2016 from 12:00pm - 1:00pm in McDonough Room 425. Applications are due September 6, 2017.

Course Descriptions

Please see below and the online Curriculum Guide for the Week One 2017 course offerings.

Closing a Deal: Practical Writing for Transactional Practice

Professor Jennifer Overall

This Week One simulation will track a closing on a secured loan transaction. A secured loan is a common and fairly straightforward deal. The course has been designed to introduce you to the tasks that a young associate at a law firm (or a young attorney as in-house counsel) may be asked to undertake in connection to a closing, to familiarize you with the vocabulary and customs of transactional practice, and to give you the opportunity to practice professional writing and communication techniques. Students will be divided into working groups who are assigned to represent the borrower or the lender in the transaction. Working group teams for borrower and tender will also be paired and will work opposite of one another on "deal teams." The simulation will require you to draft and respond to comments on simple closing documents, exchange your drafts with and comment on opposing counsel draft documents, prepare email correspondence, and coordinate the deal closing timeline so that all documents are in final approved form in time for the closing. Writing products will include: 1) professional email correspondence, 2) closing checklists, and 3) "ancillary" transaction documents such as certificates and opinions of counsel that will be based on forms provided that you will modify according to the facts of the transaction. Not every student will prepare each document, instead you will be responsible for allocating the workload among your team in a setting that mimics the process of closing a real deal. There will also be one simulated negotiation over an issue with an opinion on point of law under Uniform Commercial Code. No prior contracts or secured transactions experience is necessary to understand and fully participate in the course. On the last day of the course, we will hold a simulated "closing" for the transaction using hard copy documentation. 


Course No. 
CR 
Faculty 
January 9-12, 2017 from:  
Room No. 
LAWJ-611-07
(CRN #: 31391)
 1
Overall, Jennifer
6:00pm - 10:00pm 
TBA in Curriculum Guide 


Dealing Effectively with Clients, Colleagues and Opposing Counsel: Social Intelligence in the Practice of Law

Professor Jane Juliano and Amy Wind

This Week One simulation will introduce students to the essential concepts and competencies of social intelligence implicated in all forms of a law practice, including law firms, government agencies, corporations, non-profits and a solo practice. Students will learn about emotional intelligence and research that illustrates how basic brain function and other factors, such as strong emotion, influence how a person makes decisions. Using a combination of lecture, discussion, videos, skills exercises and simulations of common legal practice scenarios, this course will emphasize concrete, practical tools to increase students' effectiveness in managing themselves and their interactions with others. The course will equip students with an improved ability to effectively communicate with others and make them feel heard; present information in the most persuasive light; recognize and address their own internal biases; and deal with highly emotional or extremely difficult individuals. This course also will present positive strategies for dealing with common interpersonal relationships in the legal workplace: lawyer-client, lawyer-opposing counsel, and lawyer-co-counsel. Students completing this course will have developed a solid grasp on how to address the wide variety of interpersonal dynamics that commonly arise in the legal arena. 


Course No.
CR. 
Faculty 
January 9-12, 2017 from: 
Room No.
LAWJ-611-08
(CRN #: 31392)
Juliano, Jane
Wind, Amy
 
9:00am - 1:00pm 
TBA in Curriculum Guide 


Extradition Simulation: International Law, Human Rights, and Effective Advocacy 

Professors Jane Aiken and David Luban

This Week One simulation features an attempt by the United States to secure the extradition of two suspected terrorists who have been indicted in federal court for participating in terrorist acts on U.S. soil. In the initial indictments, the United States seeks the death penalty, a punishment which is likely to make it difficult for the countries in which the defendants now reside - France and Russia - to extradite under the international human rights treaty to which their nations are parties. Even life without parole may create extradition difficulties. Students will be assigned the role of counsel for one of the defendants or one of the governments and will be asked to evaluate whether the European Convention on Human Rights bars extradition in the circumstances of the cases. Throughout the four-day simulation, students work in small teams to interview the defendants, develop their arguments, and hone their oral advocacy skills in preparation for a mock oral argument before the European Court of Human Rights (a group of upperclass teaching fellows will serve as the judges). Through this rich fact pattern, students will not only learn to read and interpret international and foreign law texts and gain an understanding of the international human rights landscape, but they will have the opportuntity to engage in essential lawyering skills, including fact development and analysis, interviewing, problem solving, and oral advocacy skills. 

There are two sections of this course:

 Course No.
CR.  
Faculty 
January 9-12, 2017 from:
Room No. 
 LAWJ-611-01
(CRN #: 10600)
Aiken, Jane 
9:00am - 1:00pm 
TBA in Curriculum Guide
 LAWJ-611-02
(CRN #: 10601)
Luban, David 
1:30pm - 5:30pm 
TBA in Curriculum Guide


Internal Investigation Simulation: Evaluating Corruption in Corporate Transactions


Professors Erin Carroll, Michael Cedrone, and Susan McMahon

This Week One simulation involves an internal investigation by a French company that is in deal talks with a publicly-traded U.S. corporation. During its investigation, the French company uncovers evidence of bribe-like payments made as part of its operations in Africa. The French company is concerned that these payments may trigger liability under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), a U.S. statute with a wide extraterritorial reach. Fearing criminal penalties and negative press, which in turn could threaten the viability of the potential deal, the French company has engaged outside counsel to evaluate the potential risks associated with these payments and to consider ways to mitigate those risks. Working as the outside counsel, students will interview key witnesses and assess the risks posed to their clients under the provisions of the FCPA. Students will then present their findings and recommendations to their client's general counsel, played by practicing lawyers from Georgetown Law's alumni network. By participating in this highly dynamic and realistic course, students will not only learn about statutory interpretation and the role of the FCPA in corporate transactions, but they will have the opportunity to engage in essential lawyering skills, including fact development and analysis, interviewing, counseling, teambuilding, project management, problem solving, and presentation skills. 

There are three sections of this course: 


 Course No.
CR.  
Faculty 
January 9-12, 2017 from:
Room No.
 LAWJ-611-03
(CRN #: 10602)
Cedrone, Michael 
9:00am - 1:00pm 
TBA in Curriculum Guide 
 LAWJ-611-04
(CRN #: 30495)
Carroll, Erin
1:30pm - 5:30pm 
TBA in Curriculum Guide 
LAWJ-611-97
(CRN #: 22155
McMahon, Susan
6:00pm - 10:00pm
TBA in Curriculum Guide 


Privacy, Civil Liberties and Face Recognition: Legislating Privacy Protections for 21st Century Tracking Technology


Professor Alvaro Bedoya

For decades, American law enforcement has tracked our technology - our phones, our cars, and our computers. The latest generation of law enforcement technology tracks our bodies. And unlike fingerprint technology - the legacy biometric of law enforcement - the latest generation of biometric technology can be captured remotely and in secret. At the center of that drive is face recognition technology. Recently the FBI revealed that it had access to a network of 411 million photos, roughly a third of which are drawn from state driver's license photo databases. Meanwhile, private companies are not sitting on the sidelines. Instead, major brick-and-mortar retailers like Walmart are deploying face recognition technology to identify shoplifters, "complainers," and "known litigious individuals" the moment they set foot inside a store. At the same time, enterprising app developers are bringing this ability to identify anyone with the touch of a button to the hands of private citizens. Despite the advanced deployment, the Supreme Court has yet to recognize a right to privacy in public - and only two of fifty states regulate commercial use of face recognition. If there was ever a time to pass legislation to regulate face recognition, it is now. This Week One simulation will teach students the nuts and bolts of privacy advocacy - not just in the courtroom, but in Congress and in state legislatures around the country. Students will learn about how face recognition technology works and how it is being deployed by both law enforcement and commercial actors. Then, they will debate the evolving Fourth Amendment doctrine around tracking in public and develop familiarity with the law and the technology, the core challenge of the course will begin - students will draft legislation to regulate either law enforcement or commercial use of face recognition, prepare the accompanying pitch documents, and pitch their legislative proposals to a panel of congressional staffers (themselves predominantly played by students), who will question and challenge their proposals. In addition to teaching students the law and technology surround face recognition, students will learn legislative drafting, strategy, and presentation skills. They will also work collaboratively in teams to complete a time-consuming and complex challenge. 

Course No.
CR. 
Faculty 
January 9-12, 2017 from:
Room No. 
LAWJ-611-05
(CRN #: 10604
Bedoya, Alvaro 
1:30pm - 5:30pm 
TBA in Curriculum Guide 

Questioning Witnesses In and Out of Court


Professor Michael F. Williams and Jonathan Rusch

This Week One simulation will introduce students to a critical dimension of lawyering: the law, practice, and ethics of questioning witnesses effectively in a non-adversarial and adversarial situations. Through lectures, simulation exercises (i.e., mock depositions, grand jury proceedings, and trials), and oral and written feedback, students gain exposure to the forensic techniques needed to effectively question witness in both informal and formal settings, a skill set whose value in the practice of law is not limited to litigation. This course is an excellent introduction to the type of materials covered in upperlevel elective courses such as Trial Practice and Civil Litigation Practice. The course does not require students to have taken Evidence, but will introduce students to selected key evidentiary issues that they need to understand in order to construct lines of questions and individual questions to elicit responsive answers (or to object successfully to opposing counsel's questions). For class each evening, students will have limited assigned readings before class (which may include fact patterns and mock documents for the next day's exercises), and handle questions in mini-problems involving witness questioning in both civil and criminal practice. The scenarios are expected to include situations such as: (1) informal interviews of corporate employees and other individuals by outside counsel conducting internal investigations of alleged wrongdoing, such as consumer fraud, economic sanctions violations, foreign bribery, organized crime, and SEC disclosure violations; (2) informal and formal interviews of government employees, government-contractor officers and employees, and other individuals by counsel for a Congressional committee investigating alleged fraud against the government; (3) formal non-adversarial questioning of witnesses in civil and criminal depositions, and in federal grand jury proceedings; and (4) formal adversarial questioning of witnesses in civil and criminal trials. Students can expect to be conducting witness questioning each evening of class and to enhance their and their classmates' learning through a highly participatory and supportive environment. 

There are two sections of this course: 

Course No.  
CR.  
Faculty 
January 9-12, 2017 from:  
Room No. 
LAWJ-611-13
(CRN #: 31627)
1 
 Williams, Michael F.
 9:00am - 1:00pm

TBA in Curriculum Guide
LAWJ-611-17
(CRN #: 31393)
 1
 
Rusch, Jonathan 
 
6:00pm - 10:00pm
 
TBA in Curriculum Guide

World Health Assembly Simulation: Negotiation Regarding Climate Change Impacts on Health 


Professors Vicki Arroyo, Oscar Cabrera, Rebecca Reingold, and Sara Hoverter

This Week One simulation will introduce students to the science and impacts of climate change, including effects on health such as heat stress, vector-borne disease, and food security. It will provide students an opportunity to develop positions, advocate, conduct a simulated negotiation, and receive feedback to improve skills. The negotiations will take place as part of the World Health Organization's World Health Assembly. Students will represent countries and important civil society institutions in negotiating and crafting an international agreement pertaining to climate change and global health. They will have the opportunity to conduct research for their assigned country or organization, interview experts, develop strategy, negotiate, receive and incorporate feedback, and draft resolutions, treaties, or other legislative language. Our approach will allow students to go through not merely an academic negotiation exercise but to develop language that might be useful in the real world context of the World health Assembly. 


Course No. 
CR.  
Faculty 
January 9-12, 2017 from:
Room No. 
LAWJ-611-06
(CRN #: 31384
 1
Arroyo, Vicki 
Cabrera, Oscar
Reingold, Rebecca
Hoverter, Sara
 1:30pm - 5:30pm 
 TBA in Curriculum Guide

Communications Skills Boot Camp

Professor Jay Sullivan and Ethan Cadoff

As new lawyers enter the workforce, often they are not just new to the law, but new to the world of business. As the market for legal services becomes increasingly more competitive, each of us needs to distinguish ourselves not just regarding the services we provide, but in the way we provide them. Successful service providers constantly interact with colleagues and clients. Therefore, superior communication skills become essential. The Communication Skills Boot Camp is a Week One simulation course designed to help law students rethink how they share information. Students will learn to put the needs of their listeners first, both when preparing for and during the conversation, and will refine their delivery skills. Through group exercises, customized role plays, and instructor coaching, students will learn a range of communication skills, including how to: focus on the needs of others; share information with confidence and credibility; understand personal communication styles; develop a clear message and deliver it with presence; ask better questions and listen for key insights; handle questions and emotional reactions effectively; guide a problem-solving discussion; lead an effective brainstorming discussion; and implement effective habits of innovative professionals. 

There are two sections of this course: 

 Course No.
CR 
Faculty 
January 9-12, 2017 from:
Room No. 
 LAWJ-611-09
(CRN #: 31427)
 1
 Sullivan, Jay
Cadoff, Ethan
 9:00am - 1:00pm 
 TBA in Curriculum Guide
 LAWJ-611-10
(CRN #: 31428)
 1
 Sullivan, Jay
Cadoff, Ethan

 1:30pm - 5:30pm
 TBA in Curriculum Guide

 

Legal Ethics in Practice: How and Why Lawyers Get Into Trouble [Cancelled]

Professor Sheldon Krantz

This Week One simulation course will teach first-year students through role-play how lawyers may run afoul of ethics rules that govern professional responsibility. During the course's four days, students will be involved in on or more of the following matters: 

  • An internal law firm investigation of alleged associate and partner abuses in billing;
  • A U.S. Department of Justice Office of Professional Responsibility investigation of allegations relating to the failure of federal prosecutors to produce exculpatory evidence in a criminal trial; 
  • A disciplinary hearing considering conflict of interest claims against in-house counsel because of her alleged representation of both a university and its president during a criminal investigation. 

In each of these situations, students, working in teams, will be representing lawyers or prosecutors under investigation or will serve as investigating or disciplinary counsel. In these roles, students will be assigned responsibility for fact-finding--reviewing documents and interviewing prospective witnesses, researching pertinent ethics rules, and making arguments either on behalf or against those either being investigated or tried for ethical violations. Through these role-playing assignments, students will learn how to analyze rules of professional conduct, engage in fact-finding, and serve as advocates in disciplinary settings. Upper-class teaching fellows will serve clients, potential witnesses, and decision-makers in the disciplinary setting.

Note: This course does NOT meet the J.D. Professional Responsibility graduation requirement. For a list of the PR series courses, please see the Legal Profession/Professional Responsibility cluster essay.  

 Course No.
CR 
Faculty 
January 9-12, 2017 from:
Room No. 
LAWJ-611-11
(CRN #: 31430)
Krantz, Sheldon 
Cancelled
TBA in Curriculum Guide 

Employment Litigation Simulation: Fact Development and Settlement Negotiation

Professor Mark A. Cohen

Fact development and settlement negotiation are pivotal elements of legal practice, especially litigation. This Week One simulation course will teach first-year students through role-play how to marshal facts and to distinguish fact (e.g. that which is provable, relevant, and admissible) from opinion (e.g. much of what appears on the Internet). Students will be presented with a case involving the non-renewal of a head of school's employment contract and craft a claim that the non-renewal was due to age discrimination. Students will engage in fact development and conduct interviews of the client and key witnesses. They will then outline a Complaint, taking into consideration relevant case and statutory law as well as required elements to sustain the cause(s) of action. Students will negotiation a settlement, experiencing first-hand the interplay of the early stages of case development with resolution. 

During the four-day course, students will be involved in one or more of the following activities: 

  • Assemble facts necessary to sustain an age discrimination claim arising from the non-renewal of the school head's contract; 
  • Interview key witnesses;
  • Translate their fact gathering into an outline of a Complaint;
  • Negotiate a settlement of the claim with counsel representing the school.

In each of these activities, students will be working in teams representing the head of school. Students will be assigned responsibility for fact development that includes document review--including social media posts--interviewing the client and key prospective witnesses, researching applicable employment and contract law, as well as considering rules of professional conduct. They will outline a settlement strategy then engage in negotiations. Teaching assistants will act as a counsel representing the school.  

 Course No.
CR 
Faculty 
January 9-12, 2017 from:
Room No. 
 LAWJ-611-09
(CRN #: 31430)
 Cohen, Mark A.
9:00am - 1:00pm 
 TBA in Curriculum Guide

Information Sessions 

Law Center administration will be hosting an information session on Week One on Monday, October 3 (3:30 pm) in Hart Auditorium and Tuesday, October 4 (8:00 pm) in McDonough 200.  The sessions will be identical.  We will talk about the courses being offered, Week One requirements and logistics, the lottery process, as well as other Law Center-hosted events and programs that take place during the Week One time (January 9-12, 2017).   Powerpoint presentation from the 10/3 session available here; video recording of this session available here.

Lottery Form

The 2017 lottery form for first-year Week One simulation courses will be posted here on Thursday, September 29, 2016 at 3:00 pm and will remain active until 3:00 pm on Thursday October 6. 

Lottery Results

The Week One 2017 lottery results are posted on the secure website here (NetID and password required). To accept or decline your seat, please use this form here.