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Law Asia

Our Team

JAMES V. FEINERMAN

Faculty Director 

A leading scholar of Asian law, Professor Feinerman is the James M. Morita Professor of Asian Legal Studies and also the Associate Dean for Transnational Programs. He is also the Faculty Director of Georgetown Law Asia. Professor Feinerman joined the Law Center faculty as a visiting professor for the 1985-86 academic year. Immediately after law school he studied in the People’s Republic of China. Subsequently, he joined the New York firm of Davis Polk & Wardwell as a corporate associate. During 1982-83, Professor Feinerman was Fulbright Lecturer on Law at Peking University. In 1986, he was a Fulbright researcher in Japan. In 1989, he was awarded a MacArthur Foundation fellowship to study China’s practice of international law. During the 1992-93 academic year, he was a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. From 1993-95, on leave from the Law Center, Professor Feinerman was the Director of the Committee on Scholarly Communication with China. Professor Feinerman served as Editor-in-Chief of the ABA’s China Law Reporter from 1986-1998. Also, Professor Feinerman was the Co-editor of The Limits of the Rule of Law in China (2001), and Co-Author of China After the WTO:What You Need to Know Now (2001).

YVONNE TEW

Faculty Scholar

Professor Yvonne Tew teaches and writes in the areas of constitutional law and comparative constitutional law. Before joining the faculty at Georgetown, she taught at Columbia Law School as an Associate-in-Law and was a Hauser Global Research Fellow at the New York University School of Law. She completed her Ph.D. in comparative constitutional law at the University of Cambridge as a Gates Cambridge Scholar. Her dissertation was awarded the Distinction in Research Prize in the Arts and Humanities in 2012 by St. Catharine’s College, University of Cambridge. While at the University of Cambridge, she served as the Editor-in-Chief of the Cambridge Student Law Review (the flagship student-run law review).

Professor Tew received her first law degree from the University of Cambridge graduating with Double First Class Honors. She then graduated from Harvard Law School with a Master of Laws (LL.M.) after winning the Cambridge-Harvard Law Link scholarship awarded to the top two final-year law graduates from the University of Cambridge admitted to Harvard Law School. She has worked as an attaché at the Permanent Mission of Malaysia to the United Nations in New York and is a member of the New York state bar. She has taught at the University of Cambridge and Columbia Law School. Her work has been published in the Columbia Journal of Transnational Law, the Cambridge Law Journal, the Washington International Law Journal, and several edited book volumes. Her book on constitutional adjudication in Southeast Asia is forthcoming with Oxford University Press.

THOMAS E. KELLOGG

Executive Director

Thomas E. Kellogg is Executive Director of Georgetown Law Asia, where he oversees various programs related to law and governance in Asia. He is a leading scholar of legal reform in China, Chinese constitutionalism, and civil society movements in China.

Prior to joining Georgetown Law, Kellogg was Director of the East Asia Program at the Open Society Foundations. At OSF, he oversaw the expansion of the Foundation’s work in China, and also launched its work on Taiwan and North and South Korea. During his time at OSF, Kellogg focused most closely on civil society development, legal reform, and human rights. He also oversaw work on a range of other issues, including public health, environmental protection, and media development.

Kellogg has written widely on law and politics in China, US-China relations, and Asian geopolitics. He has lectured on Chinese law at a number of universities in the United States, China, and Europe. He has also taught courses on Chinese law at Columbia, Fordham, and Yale Law Schools.

Before joining the Open Society Foundations, Kellogg was a Senior Fellow at the China Law Center at Yale Law School. Prior to that, he worked as a researcher in the Asia Division of Human Rights Watch. He holds degrees from Harvard Law School, where he was Editor-in-Chief of the Harvard Human Rights Journal, and Hamilton College.

LORI SMITH

OTP Program Coordinator

Lori Smith, Program Coordinator for the Office of Transnational Programs (OTP), came to Georgetown Law from Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service, where she was Program Manager, then Acting Administrator of the DC-based liaison office for Georgetown’s campus in Qatar. Prior to joining Georgetown, she started her international career working for prominent for-profit organizations to develop, maintain, and manage international relationships. Early in her career, she was Senior Representative for a Fortune 100 company in Florida where she managed programs with the likes of Fuji-TV, Japan; Thames Television; and Canal Plus, to name a few. During this time she was also sent to Paris for a short stint to work with TF-1 and Antenne Deux to promote the launch of a new initiative outside of Paris. Lori was then relocated to Washington, DC where she was hired as Director of Global Promotions for an international satellite radio organization that was launching a new service designed to provide news, information, and education to developing nations in Asia and Africa. This role provided additional travel opportunities to Beijing, Osaka, Hong Kong, Nairobi, Johannesburg, and much of Europe. Lori is excited to bring this experience to her current role where she is co-managing the Global Law Scholars Program, helping with Study Abroad, and working on the Law Asia initiative with Tom Kellogg, the Executive Director.

LUCILLE BARALE

Adjunct Faculty

Professor Barale is a specialist in the legal aspects of doing business in China. In practice for more than 25 years, she has advised foreign companies on direct investments, mergers and acquisitions, as well as technology licensing, engineering and construction projects, distribution and retailing operations, and the protection of intellectual property rights in China. Ms. Barale started her career in Hong Kong with Coudert Brothers, then moved to their Beijing office in 1993, where she worked through July 1989. She then spent the next four years in the firm’s Washington, D.C. office, working with US-based clients on their China projects. In 1993, she joined the Frankfurt office of Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, where she advised European companies on their China projects through the firm’s London, Paris and Frankfurt offices. In 1996, she moved back to Hong Kong as a partner in the firm, travelling frequently to the Beijing and Shanghai offices. She retired from Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer at the end of 2006. During her years in China, Ms. Barale took an active role in the American Chamber of Commerce in the People’s Republic of China, especially in promoting its recognition by the PRC government. In 1989, she was elected President of AmCham China. In Hong Kong, Ms. Barale continued to be active in the American Chamber of Commerce, first as chair of the China Business Committee, then as a member of the board of governors. In 2004, she was elected as Chair to lead the American Chamber in Hong Kong. In 2005, Ms. Barale chaired the AmCham Charitable Foundation.

Ms. Barale has advised on a wide variety of China projects ranging from cars and chemical plants to pharmaceuticals and franchising. She has also advised multinational corporations on the restructuring of joint ventures and the expansion of operations in China.

CARL GOODMAN

Adjunct Faculty

Professor Goodman is a retired partner in the firm of Jones, Day and had previously been a partner in the firm of Surrey & Morse. He began his legal career in the U.S. Department of Justice and was a special assistant to the Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division. Following that assignment, he moved on to serve in the Civil Division’s Office of Alien Property, then to the U.S. Department of State. Professor Goodman also served in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and then as General Counsel of the Civil Service Commission. Following his government service, he rejoined Surrey & Morse in their New York office, where he developed a Japan-related practice and became a partner in Jones Day when Surrey & Morse and Jones Day merged in 1986. Retiring from Jones Day in 1991, Professor Goodman became a professor of Anglo-American law at the Hiroshima University in Japan.

Since returning to the United States in 1995, he has been a consultant to Japanese companies and their American subsidiaries. Professor Goodman is a member of the American Law Institute and a previous member of the Council of the Administrative Law Section of the ABA. He is the author of the Handbook of Public Personnel Law published by the Law Journal Press, and numerous law review articles dealing with international law and civil service legal issues. He has also written widely on Japanese law. Professor Goodman has lectured on American Law at Japanese universities and on Japanese Law in the United States and Canada. He was the recipient of Charles Fehy Distinguished Adjunct Professor Award, Georgetown University Law Center.

NESTOR GOUNARIS

Adjunct Faculty

Nestor Gounaris has been working in and on China for over twenty years. Nestor has represented over 600 clients of varied industries and nationalities on matters ranging from large scale investment projects to multi-million dollar cross-border trade disputes. He was an associate at O’Melveny & Myers and Simmons & Simmons in their respective Shanghai offices before joining China Solutions, where he served as managing partner for eight years. Maintaining his affiliation with China Solutions, Nestor is now Regional Counsel for Asia Pacific for Stepan Company, a US-listed entity with over US$2 billion annual revenue.

In addition to teaching at Georgetown, Nestor has also taught Chinese business law courses at University of Virginia Law and UCLA Law School. Prior to becoming a lawyer, he worked on at the National Committee on US-China Relations, the Committee for Scholarly Communications with China, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Henry Luce Foundation.

Nestor attended University of Virginia Law School and Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service, and serves on Georgetown Law School’s Asian Advisory Board. He is a member of the New York Bar and is fluent in Mandarin and Modern Greek.

JOONGI KIM

Adjunct Faculty

Professor Kim is Professor of Law and Associate Dean for International Affairs at Yonsei Law School in Seoul, Korea. He has published widely on corporate governance, international trade, dispute resolution and corruption. He was the Founding Executive Director of the Hills Governance Center in Korea and previously held professorship positions at Hongik University and the National University of Singapore, and practiced at Foley & Lardner in Washington, D.C. He presently acts as an Academic Council Member for the CSIS’s Hills Program on Governance, an Advisor to the ICC Korea’s Commercial Law and Practice Section, a Special Advisor to the Council for the Korean Pact on Anti-Corruption and Transparency, and an Editorial Board Member of Corporate Ownership and Control, International Trade Law and Korean Arbitration Review. He received his academic degrees from Columbia (BA), Yonsei (MA) and Georgetown (JD).

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