Legal Expert Systems in the ClassroomDesign

The role of lawyers is shifting from representing clients on individual matters to designing processes and systems to solve client problems. As part of this trend, legal technologies are increasingly important to 21st century practice. New career paths as legal solutions architects are emerging that require law graduates to think differently about law. These changes in the market for legal services is prompting law schools to revisit their curriculums with an eye to incorporating principles of legal systems design. 

Teamwork

In today's legal and business environment the ability to work effectively on a team is a core skill. The traditional law school curriculum provides few opportunities to learn teamwork. Experiential courses where students work together to execute ambitious projects offer an opportunity to learn to draw on the diverse strengths and skills among teammates.  

 Legal Expert Systems in the ClassroomApps

Law students are eager to work on projects that have meaningful consequences. Apps that increase access to the legal system satisfy this deep urge to engage with the world outside the classroom and draw on the digital facility students developed before they came to law school. 

 

Technology. Efficiency. Results. Clients insist on it. Justice demands it. The second machine age has arrived. No coding required. 

 


Tanina Rostain, Professor, Georgetown Law Center, and Kevin Mulcahy, Education Director, Neota Logic, are collaborating to create teaching materials for license to other law schools interested in offering a course on legal expert system design. Click here for descriptions of the project and course and sample teaching videos and exercises. The materials will be available for adoption in the 2014-2015 academic year. For further information, please contact Tanina Rostain.

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