Summer Program

Scholarships

 

The Giulia Tamayo Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights Litigation Scholarship

Description: Macintosh HD:private:var:folders:hp:_8j6tlv153v74d3rz9lhf1sr0000gn:T:TemporaryItems:Tamayo1edited.jpg“In 2014 the world lost a tireless fighter for the causes of human rights, health rights, and social justice. Among her many, many accomplishments, Giulia Tamayo may be best known for the investigative work that exposed that the autocratic regime of Alberto Fujimori as responsible for systematically sterilizing over a quarter of a million, overwhelmingly indigenous, women, and the situation’s eventual litigation, which together with colleagues from two Peruvian institutions, ended up in the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

In addition to the law reform and the litigation of the landmark case Mamerita Mestanza v. Peru, the revelations of forced sterilizations led to tremendous social and political mobilization, in which Giulia always had a hand. Not only did the blatant injustice of the sterilizations unite the sometimes disparate human rights movement in Peru at least for a time but reproductive rights and health became part of the public agenda for democratization, which eventually led to the resignation of Fujimori.


Social change and democratic progress do not happen in a vacuum, and Giulia understood that it was necessary to build institutions and networks, both nationally and regionally, in order to advance women’s rights. For Giulia, rights were constitutive of our experience of being human, and she felt at a visceral as well as intellectual level that for those who do not have power for women and children and indigenous groups using rights tools was the only way to enable them to live lives of dignity, as full and equal members of society."

Alicia Ely Yamin, JD MPH

Visiting Professor of Law,Georgetown University Law Center,and

Program Director,Health and Human Rights Initiative

O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law


The full In Memoriam: Giulia Tamayo, 1958-2014 written by Alicia Ely Yamin was originally published in the Health And Human Rights Journal on September 11, 2014 (Volume 16, Number 2). To read the complete In Memoriam view here.

In honor of her tireless work and important legacy, the O’Neill Institute will provide a full tuition scholarship to its 2017 Health Rights Ligigation Intensive. To apply for the Giulia Tamayo Human Rights Litigation Scholarship, please submit:

  1. 1an essay (no more than 1000 words) describing why you have dedicated yourself to advancing sexual and reproductive rights and gender equality, and how you have demonstrated sustained commitment to this field, as well as how you believe the course will specifically benefit the work you are planning to do;

  2. a letter of recommendation; and

  3. the regular application for the course

Recipients of this and any other named scholarships will be recognized publicly during the course.

 


The Heather Adams Disability Rights Scholarship

Heather Adams, a human rights lawyer and mother of three children, including a cherished son with an intellectual disability, dedicated her life to the rights of people with intellectual disabilities, including autism in particular. Heather joined the Harvard FXB Center for Health and Human Rights as a fellow in 2012 and, building on her research and advocacy on human rights and disabilities, went on to found and direct the FXB Center’s Program on Empowering People with Intellectual Disabilities. She worked with groups around the world that advanced the rights of children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities, including the Happy Child Center in Palestine.

One of the concerns that motivated Heather’s work was the dramatic inadequacy in access to essential services for persons with intellectual disabilities. For example, despite the incidence of autism and its lifelong consequences for those with the condition and their families, the provision of institutional and community care is dramatically deficient in the United States and other high-income countries, needless to say also in middle-income and low-income countries.


Heather was not just a tireless and passionate advocate, but also a pragmatic one. She was not seeking merely good laws or policies, but wanted to see them translated into effective change in institutions and funding and most of all, in people’s lives.


These two paragraphs are based upon a tribute to Heather Adams life is based on the following post by Jacqueline Bhabha and Jennifer Leaning: Heather Adams: Remembering a Visionary Leader in Disability Rights and a Beloved Friend.


In honor of her tireless work and important legacy, the O’Neill Institute will provide a full tuition scholarship to its 2017 Health Rights Litigation Intensive. To apply for the Heather Adams Disability Rights Scholarship, please submit:


  1. an essay (no more than 1000 words) describing why you have dedicated yourself to advancing disability rights, and how you have demonstrated sustained commitment to this field, as well as how you believe the course will specifically benefit the work you are planning to do;

  2. a letter of recommendation; and

  3. the regular application for the course


Recipients of this and any other named scholarships will be recognized publicly during the course. Candidates who apply for this fellowship can focus on how their work will advance the rights of persons with intellectual, psychiatric or physical disabilities, or any combination thereof, but should also articulate the connection to health.


 


The Yul Francisco Dorado Corporate Accountability Litigation Scholarship

 

A human-rights lawyer who fearlessly challenged corporate abuse around the world, Yul Francisco Dorado lived a life of profound impact. Yul, who served as the Latin America director of the nonprofit Corporate Accountability International, leaves an outsized legacy on public health, the environment and human rights that extends far beyond Latin America--and well beyond his lifespan.

In his early years, Yul was an integral part of partnering with the governments of Uruguay, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, and Costa Rica to ratify and then implement the global tobacco treaty. In partnership with a powerful coalition of public health and civil society groups, Yul led a campaign to mobilize public officials and organize a massive grassroots movement in Colombia that helped make the impossible possible: Colombia ratified the global tobacco treaty in 2006 and then went on to pass its landmark national tobacco control law -- one of the strongest in the world.

Yul cared passionately about the right to water and the rest of our ecosystem as well, sharing lessons learned about working across political and party lines with water justice allies and leveraging the precedent of the global tobacco treaty to remove the fossil fuel industry’s influence over climate policy.

More recently, Yul brought together policymakers and civil society leaders across Latin America to protect public policy from the tobacco industry. He traveled around the world speaking with tobacco control lawyers on liability: how to apply a provision in the global tobacco control treaty, which holds the tobacco industry legally and financially liable for its abuses. Yul knew that these corporate accountability measures of the global tobacco treaty were critical for protecting peoples health. As importantly, he saw them as potent tools for shifting power back to people and democratic institutions, and away from transnational corporations.

This summary of Yul Francisco Dorado’s life is based on two posts by Patti Lynn, In Memoriam: Yul Francisco Dorado Was a True Champion for People and the Environment and Celebrating Yul Francisco Dorado, A Determined Visionary


In honor of his tireless work and important legacy, the O’Neill Institute will provide a full tuition scholarship to its 2017 Health Rights Litigation Intensive. To apply for the Yul Francisco Dorado Corporate Accountability Litigation Scholarship, please submit:


  1. an essay (no more than 1000 words) describing why you have dedicated yourself to advancing corporate accountability and health rights, and how you have demonstrated sustained commitment to this field, as well as how you believe the course will specifically benefit the work you are planning to do;

  2. a letter of recommendation; and

  3. the regular application for the course.

Recipients of this and any other named scholarships will be recognized publicly during the course.