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First-Year Week One Simulations

Key Dates - Week One 2019 (coming soon!)


Overview

Georgetown Law offers its first-year students the opportunity to take elective simulation courses during the week before the Spring semester (“Week One”), on a seat available basis.  In these Week One courses, students engage in scenarios that have been developed by Georgetown Law faculty to mirror situations that lawyers face in the real world, allowing students to practice critical legal skills such as conflict resolution, trial skills, interviewing, client counseling, legislative drafting, advocacy, strategic planning, problem solving, teambuilding, presentation skills, professionalism, and emotional intelligence.  Simulation courses are structured to permit for mistakes and provide opportunities for immediate feedback and reflection, giving students the supportive space to hone these legal skills before they need to rely on them in practice. For first-year students, the Week One courses are not only an introduction to experiential learning and the Law Center’s experiential education programming (http://www.law.georgetown.edu/go/lawexp), but a first-hand view into lawyering competencies and law in practice.  

Week One 2019 will take place from Monday, January 7 through Thursday, January 10, 2019.  Week One courses are optional, 1-credit courses, are graded pass/fail, and count toward the 6 credits of experiential coursework required of students matriculating as first-year students in Fall 2016 or later.  Attendance at all class sessions is mandatory.  Our current offerings are described below and in the online Curriculum Guide.  

A lottery will be conducted in the Fall semester for interested students.  More information will be posted on this site and emailed to students closer to the time of the lottery.

Are you an upperclass student and interested in serving as a teaching fellow for a first-year Week One simulations course? Check out our Week One Teaching Fellows course description for more information. Teaching fellows earn 1 credit, pass/fail toward the spring semester. Applications are due Summer 2018 (date TBD).

Course Descriptions

Please see below and the online Curriculum Guide for the 2019 first-year simulation course offerings.

Congressional Hearing Simulation: Updating the Fair Labor Standards Act for Today's Economy

Professors Indivar Dutta-Gupta and Laura Tatum

President Franklin D. Roosevelt called the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) of 1938 "the most far-reaching, far-sighted program for the benefit of workers ever adopted in this or any other country." The historic FLSA established the minimum wage, created a standard workweek, and outlawed child labor. Almost eighty years later, many argue that the law is too rigid for today's 21st century workplace and gig economy. Others content that the law must be strengthened to better protect workers, many of whom face job insecurity; wage theft; or lack of health, retirement, and unemployment benefits. Most agree that the law needs to be updated -- but how?

In this dynamic and realistic Week One simulation, students will prepare for and conduct a Congressional hearing on updating the FLSA. Working in teams, students will gain experience in the key components of preparing for and conducting a hearing including writing, delivering, and responding to opening statements, testimony, and questions. Students will play the roles of witnesses including Department of Labor leadership, business leaders, workers advocates, and others, as well as Democratic and Republican Congressional staff. Members of Congress will be played by outside experts. Upperclass teaching fellows will help guide student preparation for the hearing and may also serve as Members of Congress in the simulation.

 Course CRN:
 CR
Faculty 
 January 7-10, 2019 from:
 Room No.
 CRN #: 33612
 1
Dutta-Gupta, Indivar 
Tatum, Laura
 1:30 - 5:30 pm
 TBA in Curriculum Guide


Internal Investigation Simulation: Evaluating Corporate Corruption 

Professors Erin Carroll, Michael Cedrone, and Susan McMahon

This Week One simulation involves an internal investigation by a French company that is in deal talks with a publicly-traded U.S. corporation. During its investigation, the French company uncovers evidence of bribe-like payments made as part of its operations in Africa. The French company is concerned that these payments may trigger liability under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), a U.S. statute with a wide extraterritorial reach. Fearing criminal penalties and negative press, which in turn could threaten the viability of the potential deal, the French company has engaged outside counsel to evaluate the potential risks associated with these payments and to consider ways to mitigate those risks. Working as the outside counsel, students will interview key witnesses and assess the risks posed to their clients under the provisions of the FCPA. Students will then present their findings and recommendations to their client's general counsel, played by practicing lawyers from Georgetown Law's alumni network. By participating in this highly dynamic and realistic course, students will not only learn about statutory interpretation and the role of the FCPA in corporate transactions, but they will have the opportunity to engage in essential lawyering skills, including fact development and analysis, interviewing, counseling, teambuilding, project management, problem solving, and presentation skills. 

There are three sections of this course: 


 Course CRN:
CR.  
Faculty 
January 7-10, 2019 from:
Room No.
CRN #: 10602

Cedrone, Michael 
9:00am - 1:00pm 
TBA in Curriculum Guide 
CRN #: 30495

Carroll, Erin
1:30pm - 5:30pm 
TBA in Curriculum Guide 
CRN #: 22155

McMahon, Susan
6:00pm - 10:00pm
TBA in Curriculum Guide 

Internet Defamation Simulation: Alternative Dispute Resolution in a Transnational Dispute

Professor Julie L. Ross

This Week One simulation course is designed to introduce you to some of the issues that arise in transnational disputes and the skills employed by lawyers representing clients in the context of an international dispute proceeding.  The course uses a single problem involving an article on a California news website alleging that a French plaintiff used his wine export business to launder money for organized crime figures in Russia and Italy.  The French plaintiff has alleged that he was defamed by the article, and the parties, which also include a U.S.-based web hosting service, have agreed to resolve the dispute through an internal arbitration proceeding.

Students will be assigned roles and will work in teams, representing one of the three parties to the dispute.  They will begin the week by conducting client interviews to ascertain the facts from their client's perspective.  After debriefing on the client interview process, students will prepare for a simulated international arbitration hearing in which each student will argue whether French or United States (or some other) law should govern the dispute.  Upperclass teaching fellows, in the role of abitrators for the dispute, will render a decision on the choice of law issue, and students will then prepare for and represent their clients in a mediation session to try to settle the case on the merits.  The assigned readings and classroom sessions during the week are designed to prepare students to engage in the simulated client interview, arbitration hearing, and mediation session.  The materials and classes will introduce the theory and doctrine governing components of defamation law in several jurisdictions, limitations on liability for Internet Service Providers under U.S. and French law, choice of law theory and methodology, and techniques for preparing for arguments, interviewing clients, and conducting mediation session.

 Course CRN:
CR 
Faculty 
January 7-10, 2019 from:
Room No. 
 CRN #: 33517

Ross, Julie L.
1:30pm - 5:30pm
 TBA in Curriculum Guide


Legal Innovation -- Designing Human-Centered Solutions to Challenges in Law

Professor Daniel Li

This Week One, project-based simulation course is designed for students who want to learn methods and processes to create new and effective solutions to challenges in the legal industry. Working in teams of four, students will re-imagine how we can deliver some aspect of legal services. To do this, we will bring together principles from design thinking, business strategy, and behavioral science. 

Some examples of legal design challenges that teams may take on: 

  1. How might we reduce the rate of default in landlord-tenant court?
  2. How might lawyers in firms improve the billing process for clients? 
  3. How might we improve the likelihood that consumers will read, understand, and respond to a product recall notice? 
  4. How might we help qualifying pro se litigants take advantage of free filing policies in D.C. Superior Court? 
Over four fast-paced, intense days, teams will: map out and study the problem, sketch out competing ideas, turn your ideas into testable prototypes, and validate the key elements you will need if your idea is going to work. At the end of  Week One, you will pitch your proposed solution to a key influence in the legal industry. 

Course CRN:
CR. 
Faculty 
January 7-10, 2019 from:
Room No. 
CRN #: 35339

Li, Daniel
6:00pm - 10:00pm
TBA in Curriculum Guide 

Questioning Witnesses In and Out of Court

Professor Michael F. Williams. Jonathan Brightbill, and Jonathan Rusch

This Week One simulation will introduce students to a critical dimension of lawyering: the law, practice, and ethics of questioning witnesses effectively in a non-adversarial and adversarial situations. Through lectures, simulation exercises (i.e., mock depositions, grand jury proceedings, and trials), and oral and written feedback, students gain exposure to the forensic techniques needed to effectively question witness in both informal and formal settings, a skill set whose value in the practice of law is not limited to litigation. This course is an excellent introduction to the type of materials covered in upperlevel elective courses such as Trial Practice and Civil Litigation Practice. The course does not require students to have taken Evidence, but will introduce students to selected key evidentiary issues that they need to understand in order to construct lines of questions and individual questions to elicit responsive answers (or to object successfully to opposing counsel's questions). For class each evening, students will have limited assigned readings before class (which may include fact patterns and mock documents for the next day's exercises), and handle questions in mini-problems involving witness questioning in both civil and criminal practice. The scenarios are expected to include situations such as: (1) informal interviews of corporate employees and other individuals by outside counsel conducting internal investigations of alleged wrongdoing, such as consumer fraud, economic sanctions violations, foreign bribery, organized crime, and SEC disclosure violations; (2) informal and formal interviews of government employees, government-contractor officers and employees, and other individuals by counsel for a Congressional committee investigating alleged fraud against the government; (3) formal non-adversarial questioning of witnesses in civil and criminal depositions, and in federal grand jury proceedings; and (4) formal adversarial questioning of witnesses in civil and criminal trials. Students can expect to be conducting witness questioning each evening of class and to enhance their and their classmates' learning through a highly participatory and supportive environment. 

There are two sections of this course: 

Course CRN: 
CR.  
Faculty 
January 7-10, 2019 from:  
Room No. 
CRN #: 31627

1 
Williams, Michael F.
Brightbill, Jonathan D.
 9:00am - 1:00pm

TBA in Curriculum Guide


CRN #: 31393

 1
 
Rusch, Jonathan 
 
6:00pm - 10:00pm
 
TBA in Curriculum Guide

Social Intelligence in the Practice of Law: Dealing Effectively with Clients, Colleagues, and Opposing Counsel

Professor Jane Juliano and Amy Wind

This Week One simulation will introduce students to the essential concepts and competencies of social intelligence implicated in all forms of a law practice, including law firms, government agencies, corporations, non-profits and a solo practice. Students will learn about emotional intelligence and research that illustrates how basic brain function and other factors, such as strong emotion, influence how a person makes decisions. Using a combination of lecture, discussion, videos, skills exercises and simulations of common legal practice scenarios, this course will emphasize concrete, practical tools to increase students' effectiveness in managing themselves and their interactions with others. The course will equip students with an improved ability to effectively communicate with others and make them feel heard; present information in the most persuasive light; recognize and address their own internal biases; and deal with highly emotional or extremely difficult individuals. This course also will present positive strategies for dealing with common interpersonal relationships in the legal workplace: lawyer-client, lawyer-opposing counsel, and lawyer-co-counsel. Students completing this course will have developed a solid grasp on how to address the wide variety of interpersonal dynamics that commonly arise in the legal arena. 


Course CRN:
CR. 
Faculty 
January 7-10, 2019 from: 
Room No.
CRN #: 31392

Juliano, Jane
Wind, Amy
9:00am - 1:00pm 
TBA in Curriculum Guide 

World Health Assembly Simulation: Negotiation Regarding Climate Change Impacts on Health 

Professors Vicki Arroyo, Oscar Cabrera, Rebecca Reingold, and Sara Hoverter

This Week One simulation will introduce students to the science and impacts of climate change, including effects on health such as heat stress, vector-borne disease, and food security. It will provide students an opportunity to develop positions, advocate, conduct a simulated negotiation, and receive feedback to improve skills. The negotiations will take place as part of the World Health Organization's World Health Assembly. Students will represent countries and important civil society institutions in negotiating and crafting an international agreement pertaining to climate change and global health. They will have the opportunity to conduct research for their assigned country or organization, interview experts, develop strategy, negotiate, receive and incorporate feedback, and draft resolutions, treaties, or other legislative language. Our approach will allow students to go through not merely an academic negotiation exercise but to develop language that might be useful in the real world context of the World health Assembly. 


Course CRN: 
CR.  
Faculty 
January 7-10, 2019 from:
Room No. 
CRN #: 31384

 1
Arroyo, Vicki 
Cabrera, Oscar
Reingold, Rebecca
Hoverter, Sara
 1:30pm - 5:30pm 
 TBA in Curriculum Guide


Information Sessions 

On Monday, September 18th from 3:30-4:15 pm, Law Center administrators will be on hand to answer any related Week One question you may have (on courses, on other extracurricular programming taking place during Week One, and on the process of signing up for the lottery, etc.). Location: McDonough 201

Lottery Instructions

Check our Key Dates section and the lottery instructions for more information on how to sign up.

On The Web

Maps & Directions

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Contact

Phone:202.662.9041

Email: lawjdas@georgetown.edu

Hours: Monday-Friday:
8:30am-6:00pm