Marta Baffy is a lawyer and linguist who has over fifteen years of English as a Second Language (ESL) teaching experience in the United States and Hungary. In the Two-Year LL.M. Program she prepares students for legal study in the United States, using her expertise in ESL teaching methodology and drawing on her research on the language socialization of foreign-trained attorneys. Professor Baffy is the author of the textbook Academic Legal Discourse and Analysis: Essential Skills for International Students Studying Law in the United States (with Kirsten Schaetzel). Her scholarship has been published in several linguistics journals, including the International Journal of Speech, Language and the Law; Journal of English for Academic Purposes; Linguistics and Education; and Language in Society.

Professor Baffy holds a Ph.D. in sociolinguistics from Georgetown; her dissertation focused on how students are socialized into the culture of a U.S. law school during classroom interactions. She received her J.D. from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, where she was an Associate Editor of the Cardozo Arts & Entertainment Law Journal. She holds a Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics from Teachers College, Columbia University and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (summa cum laude) from University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Professor Baffy is a member of the Massachusetts Bar.

Scholarship

Books

Marta Baffy & Kirsten Schaetzel, Academic Legal Discourse and Analysis: Essential Skills for International Students Studying Law in the United States (New York: Wolters Kluwer 2020).
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Contributions to Law Reviews and Other Scholarly Journals

Marta Baffy, Doing 'Being Interrupted' in Political Talk, 49 Language Soc’y 689-715 (2020).
Marta Baffy, Constructed Dialogue as a Resource for Promoting Students’ Socialization to Written Academic Discourse in an EAP Class, Linguistics & Educ., Aug. 2018, at 33-42.
Marta Baffy, Shifting Frames to Construct a Legal English Class, 25 J. Eng. Acad. Purposes 58-70 (2017).
Marta Baffy & Alexandria Marsters, The Constructed Voice in Courtroom Cross-Examination, 22 Intl J. Speech Language & L. 143-165 (2015).