Professor Vázquez Elected to UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

December 20, 2011 — WASHINGTON, D.C. - Georgetown University Law Center Professor Carlos Manuel Vázquez has been elected to the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. His four-year term will begin in January 2012.

“The Georgetown Law community congratulates Carlos on his election to this important post,” said Georgetown Law Dean William M. Treanor. “His significant work in this field has already been recognized on a national and international level, and many around the world will certainly benefit from his service on the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination."

The Committee is composed of 18 independent experts charged with monitoring implementation of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination. Members are elected by state parties for their high moral character and recognized competence in the field of human rights. Vázquez was nominated to this post by the United States and was among the nine experts elected to serve on the Committee by the 175 States-Parties to the Convention.

Vázquez joined the Law Center full-time faculty in 1991. He was the founding director of Georgetown Law's Human Rights Institute, and he created an international human rights practicum and an international human rights colloquium, which has brought scholars from across the United States to the Law Center to present papers on topics in the area of international human rights. He has written and taught in the areas of international law, constitutional law and federal courts.

As a member of the Inter-American Juridical Committee of the Organization of American States from 2000 to 2003, and its vice-chairman from 2002-2003, Vázquez addressed questions relating to human rights, including the relation between human rights and democracy.

A graduate of Yale University and Columbia Law School, Vázquez clerked for Judge Stephen Reinhardt of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit and practiced at Covington & Burling, where he litigated on a pro bono basis cases involving allegations of racial discrimination. He has written amicus briefs in cases involving refugee matters, including claims regarding discrimination on the basis of race and national origin in refugee policy.