Georgetown Law Appoints Daniel Halperin to Ginsburg Chair

January 14, 2013 —

Professor Daniel Halperin Professor Daniel Halperin

Georgetown University Law Center Dean William M. Treanor is pleased to announce the appointment of Daniel Halperin to the Martin D. Ginsburg Chair in Taxation. Halperin will hold the chair as a distinguished visiting professor during the 2013 spring semester. He will be formally installed during a ceremony at the Law Center on January 23.

“The selection of Dan Halperin seems especially fitting. A former member of the Georgetown Law faculty, Dan knew Marty Ginsburg well, and he is one of the country’s leading authorities on tax law and policy,” said Treanor. “We are grateful to H. Ross Perot for his generosity in endowing this chair. It is a wonderful tribute to Marty and his distinguished contributions to the legal profession and to Georgetown Law.”

Recognized as one of the nation’s top tax scholars, Halerpin has been a law professor for nearly 40 years, including 15 years at Georgetown from 1981 to 1996. Since that time, he has been the Stanley S. Surrey Professor at Harvard Law. He began his career in private practice in New York and twice served in the Office of Tax Policy at the U.S. Treasury Department, from 1967 to 1970 and 1977 to 1980. He was deputy assistant secretary from 1978 to 1980.

Halperin is an affiliated scholar with the Urban Institute, a member of the advisory board for the Urban Institute’s Project on Tax Policy and Charities and vice chairman of the board of the Pension Rights Center. He has authored numerous law review articles on qualified pension plans and retirement savings, nonprofit organizations and the timing of income and deductions under the Internal Revenue Code.

Widely regarded as one of the nation’s foremost tax law experts, Martin D. Ginsburg joined the Georgetown Law faculty in 1980, after his wife, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, became an appellate judge in Washington. He served on the Law Center faculty until his death in 2010.