Top Ten in the SSRN

May 3, 2013 — The Social Science Research Network (SSRN) database has become the go-to place for cutting-edge legal research, and the “All Time Hits” (the top 10 downloaded papers) a highly respected measure of scholarly excellence.

If you had visited the site May 2, you would have found that five of the top 10 “All Time Hits” in the category of “U.S. Constitutional Law: Interpretation & Judicial Review” are by Georgetown Law professors.

This includes Professor Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz’s “The Subjects of the Constitution” [62 Stan. L Rev. 1209 (2010)]. At number one, it’s the single most downloaded article about constitutional interpretation and judicial review (as well as structural constitutional law and federal courts) in the history of the SSRN. 

Professor Randy Barnett has two papers in the top-10 list, including “The Ninth Amendment: It Means What It Says” [Tex. L.Rev. 1-82 (2006)] at number 4 and “Scalia's Infidelity: A Critique of Faint-Hearted Originalism” [University of Cincinnati Law Review, Vol. 75, No. 7, 2006] in fifth place. 

Professor Lawrence Solum’s paper “Semantic Originalism” [75 Univ. of Ill. Coll. of Law, Ill. Pub. Law & Legal Theory Research Paper Series, No. 07-24, 2008] is seventh. 

In recent years, virtually all new legal scholarship is uploaded into the SSRN Library, and the list of most frequently downloaded papers provides an indication of which scholarship is making an impact on the world, explains Professor Mike Seidman, whose satirical article “A Thought Experiment” [Georgetown Public Law Research Paper No. 13-021] weighs in at number 10. (It has also been number one in the “Recent Hits” list, for all papers announced in the last 60 days.)  

“It is quite significant that five of the top 10 papers on SSRN’s list of most frequently downloaded articles on constitutional interpretation and judicial review are written by Georgetown scholars,” Seidman says.