About Us

Sarah Roache

Sarah Roache, LL.M., is the Director of the Global Health LL.M. program at the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, Georgetown University Law Center. She also leads the O’Neill Institute’s broader health law capacity building programs, including developing intensive health law trainings for lawyers and government officials working at the intersection of law and health.

Sarah’s substantive expertise includes legal and policy interventions to reduce key non-communicable disease risk factors. Prior to joining the O’Neill Institute, Sarah worked as a complex class action litigator, representing victims of tobacco related diseases and thalidomide survivors. She also has experience as a social and legal policy adviser to government and NGOs, including formulating best practice domestic implementation of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

Sarah holds a Master of Laws in Global Health Law from Georgetown University, where she received the Thomas Bradbury Chetwood, S.J. Prize for the most distinguished academic record. Sarah also holds a Bachelor of Laws (Hons) and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Melbourne, Australia.


SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

2017
Roache SA, Gostin LO. The Untapped Power of Soda Taxes: Incentivizing Consumers, Generating Revenue, and Altering Corporate Behavior. International Journal of Health Policy and Management. 2017;6:1-5. doi: 10.15171/ijhpm.2017.69.


Gostin LO, Abou Taleb H, Roache SA, Alwan A. Legal priorities for prevention of non- communicable diseases: innovations from WHO’s Eastern Mediterranean region. Public Health. 2017 Mar;144:4-12. doi: 10.1016/j.puhe.2016.11.001.

2016
Roache SA, Gostin LO, Bianco Fonsalia E. Trade, Investment, and Tobacco. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2016;316(20):2085-2086. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.14503.

 

Selected Publications


2017

Gostin, Lawrence O, Katharina O Cathaoir, and Sarah A Roache. "Advancing the Right to Health —The Vital Role of Law." American Journal of Public Health 107, no. 11 (2017): 1755-1766.