Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics

Contact Us

Journal lawgjle@georgetown.edu 202.662.9523
Subscriptions lawojasubscriptions@georgetown.edu 202.662.9423
Reprints lawoja@georgetown.edu 202.662.9423

The Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics was founded in 1987 by Father Robert Drinan. Before joining the faculty of Georgetown Law, Father Drinan served in the U.S. House of Representatives for ten years on behalf of the 4th District of Massachusetts. He dedicated his career to many human rights interests and legal causes, including the elevation of the stature of legal ethics as a discipline and in practice. Father Drinan passed away in January 2007.

Now, in our twenty-eighth year, The Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics continues to honor Father Drinan's vision for the legal profession. The Journal, through its four annual issues and featured symposia, aspires to serve as the main forum for the discussion and development of the most compelling and pertinent issues currently affecting both the Bench and the Bar. As a law journal, we seek to exemplify the mission and mandate of the legal profession articulated in Canon 32 of the Canons of Professional Ethics which was approved by the American Bar Association in 1908. Canon 32 states that the lawyer "advances the honor of his profession and the best interest of his client when he renders service or gives advice tending to impress upon the client and his undertaking exact compliance with the strictest principles of moral law…." The Journal has also broadened its vision to invite interdisciplinary scholarship and writing related to the future of the legal profession.

The Journal strives to publish cutting edge articles on ethical issues, facilitate symposia that include legal scholars, attorneys from diverse practice areas, judges, and social scientists. The Journal has a steadfast commitment to community service, which is a requirement for all staff and editors. Our mission is intended to honor and perpetuate Father Drinan's legacy of a call to practice a higher code of conduct.