The Color of Surveillance

On July 19, 2018, the Center hosted The Color of Surveillance: Government Monitoring of American Religious Minorities. American surveillance of religious minorities is far from new. Across our country’s history – from the surveillance of the Separatists we now know as Pilgrims in 16th and 17th century England, to federal house raids and interrogations of early Mormons in the Utah Territory in the 19th century, to the 20th century surveillance of Jewish, Muslim, Quaker, and Sikh communities, to modern post-9/11 surveillance systems – government monitoring has long had a deep and disparate impact on American religious minorities.

The Color of Surveillance: Government Monitoring of American Religious Minorities will trace that history, and ask hard questions about what it means: Is modern surveillance consistent with the intentions of the American founders – or, for that matter, the events that precipitated the migration of English Separatists to the New World on the Mayflower? Do modern counterterrorism initiatives appropriately protect civil rights and civil liberties? How are local communities, advocates, and artists responding to these challenges?

Schedule below.

Welcome & Introduction to The Color of Surveillance: Government Monitoring of American Religious Minorities
8:45 – 9:00am

Dean William Treanor, Georgetown Law
Alvaro Bedoya, Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law


Elizabeth I to the Early 20th Century
9:00 – 10:15am

“Hunted”: 16th & 17th Century Surveillance of Pilgrims
John Coffey, University of Leicester

Is the United States a Christian Nation?
Brooke Allen, Bennington College

“Mohammedan Barbarism”: The Campaign Against Early Mormons
J. Spencer Fluhman, Brigham Young University

The Military Intelligence Division and American Jews (A Transition)
Alvaro Bedoya, Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law

The FBI and the Moorish Science Temple of America
Sylvester A. Johnson, Virginia Tech


BREAK
10:15 – 10:30am


The 1960s to the Aftermath of 9/11
10:30 – 12:05pm

J. Edgar Hoover, Black Clergy, and Martin Luther King, Jr.
Lerone A. Martin, PhD, Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University in St. Louis

The Feeling of Being Watched: A Filmmaker’s Response
Assia Boundaoui, The Inverse Surveillance Project
Rabia Boundaoui
Xiangnong (George) Wang (moderator), Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law

Post-9/11 Watchlists
Hina Shamsi, ACLU National Security Project

Community Reflections
Members of the Center for Media Justice’s National Delegation of MASA Community Activists

 


LUNCH BREAK
12:05 – 1:00pm


Life in Affected Communities
1:00 – 2:45pm

A Conversation on Countering Violent Extremism
Faiza Patel, Brennan Center for Justice
Ayaan Dahir, Young Muslim Collective
Eric Rosand, The Prevention Project
William Braniff, START, University of Maryland
Alvaro Bedoya (moderator), Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law

“Mosque Crawlers” and the Raza and Hassan cases
Asad Dandia, NYU Graduate Student
Farhaj Hassan, Muslims United For Justice
Laura Moy (moderator), Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law

“If they should come for us”: A Poet’s Response
Fatimah Asghar
Renata Barreto (moderator), Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law


BREAK
2:45 – 3:00pm


Community Action
3:00 – 5:25pm

Organizing after Raza
Fahd Ahmed, DRUM – Desis Rising Up & Moving

Stopping the Digital Muslim Ban: A Case Study
Rachel Levinson-Waldman, Brennan Center for Justice
Natasha Duarte, Center for Democracy & Technology
Yolanda C. Rondon, American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee
Steven Renderos, Center for Media Justice
Harrison Rudolph (moderator), Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law

Organizing in Silicon Valley
Maya Berry, Arab American Institute
Michelle Miller, Coworker.org
Jameson Spivack (moderator), Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law

Organizing Locally
Brian Hofer, Oakland Privacy

Religious Surveillance and Intersectionality
Brandi Collins-Dexter, Color Of Change

Computer Vision Surveillance: An Artist’s Response
Adam Harvey


Closing Remarks
5:25 – 5:30pm

Reception to follow in Hart lobby

 


Speakers: