Online Articles

FERC Headquarters, an independent federal agency with regulatory authority over interstate electricity, natural gas, and oil transmission.

Updates from FERC’s Feb. 15 Open Meeting

February 27, 2024 by Nathan Tatum Energy Regulations State and Local

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) held its February open meeting on Feb. 15, 2024, addressing a number of items including cold weather reliability standards, hydropower permitting, and natural gas exports.

Heavy industrial pollution leaving smokestacks in blue sky.

Has Massachusetts v. EPA Hurt the Climate?

February 23, 2024 by Diego Huerta Air Climate change Fossil Fuels Regulations State and Local

Massachusetts v. EPA is seen as an unalloyed victory for the climate movement, but over 15 years after the case was handed down, legal knock-on effects from the decision have come back to bite.

Waste Bins Overflowing on the National Mall

D.C.’s Broken Glass

February 15, 2024 by Nicholas Merrill Plastic pollution State and Local Sustainability

Washington D.C. faces a crisis of confidence regarding its glass recycling practices. Does the District actually recycle our bottles? What can be done?

View from Main Street in Ludlow. Source: Joe Shlabotnik, https://www.flickr.com/photos/joeshlabotnik/16166710787, no changes made.

Slopes Submerged: Understanding and Addressing Flooding in Ludlow

February 8, 2024 by Nicholas Alois Climate change Regulations State and Local

Last summer, Ludlow, Vermont, experienced devasting flooding after several inches of rain fell in the area in one day. In this article, Nicholas Alois discusses the flood’s impact on the community, the long rebuild process, and recommended flood prevention and mitigation efforts moving forward.

A hiker in a wheelchair takes to a trail in Yellowstone National Park. (Source: Yellowstone National Park, Flickr, https://flic.kr/p/283wvkb)

Disability Justice and the Environment: Ensuring Equal Access to Nature

January 25, 2024 by Zak Handler Public Lands State and Local

Access to nature is tremendously important to human health and wellbeing; however, it is not equitably distributed. This post examines the law governing disability access to public lands and offers suggestions for improving access.

The cattle industry, a major polluter, seems a natural target for more aggressive environmental regulation.

What’s for Dinner? The Environmental Regulatory Landscape Provides a Battleground for States to Fight Over the Meat Industry

January 5, 2024 by Eli Merkadeau Climate change Regulations State and Local

Against the backdrop of a Supreme Court highly skeptical of agency action, the meat industry has seen legislation from both states seeking environmental improvements and states looking to support their meat producers. Given the Court’s willingness to defer to impactful state legislation, states may be allowed to duke it out and try to exert control over the production of meat and meat alternatives on a national level.

Workers at the Field Museum in Chicago inspecting birds that were killed when they flew into the windows of the McCormick Place Lakeside Center. Credit: Lauren Nassef/Chicago Field Museum, via AP

Bird-Safe Building Policies Slowly Take Off Across the United States

November 30, 2023 by Giancarlo Vargas Endangered Species State and Local Wildlife

Each year in the United States, hundreds of millions of birds die after colliding with glass structures they cannot see. In the absence of federal action, cities and states are taking the lead to adopt bird-friendly architecture and policies.

Lush community garden tucked between colorful homes.

Thinking – and Acting – Expansively to Fight Climate Change

November 20, 2023 by Rachel Garwin Climate change State and Local Sustainability

Can broadening visions for climate action and building solidarity across social movements protect against climate anxiety and encourage the urgent emissions reductions needed by the end of the decade?

Plaintiffs in Held arrive for the final day of the historic trial. Credit: Thom Bridge, Independent Record via AP

What Held v. Montana immediately offers for Constitutional Environmental Rights

November 16, 2023 by Matthew Grabianski Climate change Litigation State and Local

Held v. Montana,[1] decided by Montana state court Judge Kathy Seeley last August, is already widely recognized as a landmark case in environmental law.[2] Much has been written about the ruling, which struck down a Montana provision that forbade state…