Samuel Dash Conference on Human Rights

Held each spring, the Dash Conference was established by Samuel Dash’s family and friends, Georgetown Law alumni and the law firm of Cozen O’Connor to honor Dash’s contributions to international human rights and domestic civil rights. Dash, who joined the Georgetown Law faculty in 1965, and was on the board of the International League of Human Rights, traversed the globe in pursuit of justice. He led a human rights mission to Northern Ireland to investigate the 1972 “Bloody Sunday” incident, and traveled to the Soviet Union and Chile. In 1985, he was the first American to visit Nelson Mandela in prison and became involved in mediation efforts that eventually led to Mandela’s release. Dash also served as Chief Counsel of the Senate Watergate Committee’s investigation into the Nixon administration’s involvement in the Democratic National Committee break-in, which ultimately led to President Nixon’s resignation. Professor Dash passed away in 2004.

2022: The Role of Lawyers in a Democracy in Crisis

A truly democratic society is one where everyone’s human rights are respected.

2019: Human Rights and Today's Vulnerable Migrants

The legal community's role in strengthening protections for refugees and migrants in the current political climate.

2017: Global Criminal Justice: Accomplishments, Challenges, and Future Directions

Where the global criminal justice system stands, where it falls short, and where it needs to move forward in the future.

2015: Migration, Border Externalization and Access to Humanitarian Protection Agenda

The human rights of migrants in the context of efforts to externalize control and enforcement of migration worldwide.

2014: Multilateral Development Banks & Human Rights

An ongoing review of World Bank lending safeguards and Inspection Panel reforms and an effort to frame a post-2015 global development agenda.

2013: Jurisdiction for Mass Atrocities

What tools can and should states use to fight impunity for mass atrocities.

2008: The Future of Human Rights

How should the U.S. deal with human rights abuses?